When will a prisoner be released?

A number of things can affect the length of time someone will spend in prison. This includes the date the offence was committed, the length of the sentence, whether a Home Detention Curfew (HDC) is granted and whether any extra days are added as the consequence of positive adjudications. However, for the purposes of calculating a prison sentence initially, only the first two points are taken into consideration.

Table 1: Offence committed after 4 April 2005

Length of sentence Key date Type of release Licence period etc.
Under   12 months Half-way   point Automatic   Unconditional Release No licence. (See LASPOA 2012 s 111 and CJA 2003 s 243A)
12   months + Half-way   point Automatic Conditional Release ‘On   licence’ until expiry of sentence (See CJA 2003 s 244)
IPP/DPP/EPP Tariff   expiry date as set by the court Eligible   for release. See   the IPP explanation sheet.

Table 2: Offence committed prior to 4 April 2005

Length of sentence Key date Type of release Licence period etc.
12   months – 4 years Half-way   point Automatic   Conditional Release ‘On   licence’ until ¾ of sentence complete.From   ¾ to the expiry of the sentence, they are ‘at risk’.
4   years + Half-way   point(Parole   Eligibility Date) Discretionary   release ‘On   licence’ until ¾ of sentence complete.

On licence This means that the person will be subject to regular meetings with an officer from the Probation Service. There may also be certain other conditions attached to the licence which can include living at a specified address or getting help with addressing their offending behaviour. If a person released on licence breaches any of their conditions then they can be returned to custody at the discretion of the Home Office.

See also the Release on Licence fact sheet.

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “When will a prisoner be released?

  1. Pingback: Ched Evans – Appeal refused | UK Criminal Law Blog

  2. Pingback: Why don’t people plead guilty to murder? | UK Criminal Law Blog

  3. Pingback: UK Criminal Law Blog

  4. Pingback: Derek Rose sentenced for blackmail | UK Criminal Law Blog

  5. Pingback: Michael Ireland – Spiritual Healer sent to prison | UK Criminal Law Blog

  6. Pingback: R v Huhne and Pryce – The key information | UK Criminal Law Blog

  7. Pingback: Release on Licence | UK Criminal Law Blog

  8. Pingback: Huhne and Pryce released after serving 2 months of 8-month sentences – Why? | UK Criminal Law Blog

  9. Pingback: How long will Jeremy Forrest serve? | UK Criminal Law Blog

  10. Pingback: Teenage boy jailed for raping his sister | UK Criminal Law Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s